There really isn't much to this. The first thing is to find fonts that match the text. Here's a page about the fonts that Japanese manga use (they will have normal characters for English but will be missing some characters for some other languages). If a symbol is missing in the font, there's two things you can do. Say we're missing ĝ. First, we see if another more common character like â, with the same little ˆ symbol, works. If it does, we simply write all the text with normal characters ( g ), then write â on a new layer, then turn it into a rasterized layer (it turns it into a normal image instead of text), then erase the a part so we're left with only the ˆ. If needed, we can rotate this layer and turn it up-side down for characters like ŭ.

The second option is to edit the font itself. We take a font editing program with a free trial, for example Glyphs or Robofont, and we create the missing characters ourselves. There should be a button like "add glyph" or "add symbol" somewhere, and then we would simply type in ĝ, it would create an empty spot for it, and then we piece together g and draw in an ˆ or whatever is needed. When the font is installed on someone's computer, the symbols will show up perfectly fine.


Original


My version


The average scanlation team's version

The comic is not yours just because you have scans or just because you translated or scanlated it. It is the original author, artist, and publishor's work.

Only do a lot of cleaning if you ENJOY it. No one is getting paid to scanlate. In many countries your work is illegal even when it's for free. My general rule is: No cleaning (except covering up text inside speech bubbles) unless like in the screenshots above, there's a huge, cool effect that we can edit a bit and "translate" into the translation. If the scans are horrible quality, so be it. If they want a beautiful version, they can buy the original Japanese one and print out lines of text and then glue them into the speech bubbles...